KIRSTEN LANDMAN DOES IT AGAIN

Kirsten Landman does it again
(Photo credit : Foto P : Photographer Duda Bairros)

If Dakar is like climbing Mount Everest, then the ‘Original by Motul’ class has been described as climbing Everest but with no oxygen tank – just ask South African wonder woman Kirsten Landman – South Africa’s top female enduro racer.

 
In January this year Kirsten took part in one of the hardest, and definitely the most rewarding, races of her life and finished the 2023 Dakar in the Original by Motul class, a class where riders are allowed no technical support and are required to maintain their motorcycles themselves. Kirsten (31) is no stranger to tough challenges. A professional off-road and hard enduro rider from Cape Town, she competes at the top level of her sport all over the world, thriving in a male dominated arena where she is often the only female competitor.


She has been riding since the age of 8 and launched her professional career at the age of 22. She grew up on dirt bikes and each year, with each new challenge, is making headlines and changing the way the world sees female athletes.  


Avid fans that follow her will know that Kirsten has achieved her Protea Colours for motorsport and competed in a number of major international events. She became the first female to finish races such as Red Bull Romaniacs, Red Bull Sea to Sky, Red Bull Megawatt 111, Red Bull Braveman, the Roof of Africa and in 2020, Landman was the first African women to finish the Dakar Rally in Saudi Arabia.


Motorsport South Africa (MSA) caught up with Kirsten to find out more about this incredible racer and what really goes into competing in this category where it is not just about one’s riding ability, but also about one’s mechanical competence, organisational abilities, and capacity to perform mentally and physically in the face of extreme and cumulative fatigue.


Tell us first about the Original by Motul class?
The Original by Motul class is the original Dakar class, it goes back to when Dakar originated all those many years ago. There was no such thing as assistance from service crews. The competitors would carry whatever they needed on their bikes and then the organisers would put whatever else they needed into an 80L drum and that would go from point to point. The class, also known as Malle (Malle means Trunk) Moto (Bike), emulates that same practice and is largely unassisted.


What inspired you after your 2020 Dakar to compete again, this time in an even harder class?
I grew up watching Dakar on TV. As a young Dakar fan I was fascinated with South America.  South America had this sense of adventure about it. One minute competitors were at sea level in 40 degrees; then they were in the Andes battling to breathe;  then traversing the Amazon through rivers, greenery, dunes and rock crossings. I knew that one day I wanted to participate in a race like that. Finally in 2020 I entered Dakar but felt it was not as physically challenging as I had hoped. Emotionally it was difficult. I had to overcome the fear from my accident in 2013 where I nearly lost my life at the Botswana Desert 1000 which left me in a coma for 11 days.  But from a physical perspective, everyone advised me that if I wanted the true Dakar experience, I must try Malle Moto – the Original by Motul class.  


How much harder was the 2022 Dakar when compared to 2020?
2020 was like a highway compared to 2023.  This year was so much harder in every aspect. The navigation of the road books were much harder and the time out every day, much longer.   For example, in Dakar 2020 I got back every day at 4pm compared to 2023 where I got back most days in the dark. The longest day in 2020 was 10 hours and my longest day in 2023 was 16 hours.  10 hours was in fact my average day on the bike in 2023. Then the weather conditions were a huge factor. It was hot, cold, windy and wet.  The rain made the racing so much harder, particularly when you needed to ride through rivers which I did not even know existed in the desert.  The physicality of the race took so much more out of you that I actually lost 6kg, burning 163 000 calories in the 14 stages. My step count alone every day was about 5 -6 km just going between bike, tent, the truck and the dining hall and that was over and above the racing. Dakar 2023 really was the pinnacle. It  tested us in every way possible. Emotionally it was very tough – I’ve never cried so much in my life. Physically, I’ve never pushed my body to that point, especially since I also had flu and needed to race with a fever, tight chest and dizziness.  It was definitely the hardest Dakar in many years.


What drives you to try harder and harder challenges and draws you to the sport?
I think for me it epitomises who I am. I grew up being highly competitive from a really young age. I was swimming provincially from the age of seven. Swimming is also a really tough sport you need to do on your own.   When I started riding bikes, at age  -8, I fell in love with the sport but never in my wildest dreams did I think that I would be a professional sports woman and making a career out of it.


Getting into hard enduro, is physically and emotionally demanding and really tests your true character. I tend to really cope well under those hard conditions being able to ‘vasbyt’ and just push through.  I make sure I am mentally and physically prepared before going into a race and this year I was definitely strong enough and ready to compete.  

How did you prepare for this year’s race?
I did two years of preparation. In terms of physical and bike fitness, coming from hard enduro we tend to be really fit so that helps. I live in Cape Town so the Atlantis dunes are just 20km from my house and were excellent to practice on.  I switch it around practicing on sand and normal tracks. Then off the bike, I mountain bike, surf and walk my dogs 5km every day on the beach. I also love running with my dog Sammy and hiking. My goal is to train twice a day – one hard session and one lighter session and then the daily 5km walk with the dogs.  My rest day is usually a Monday.  


You have to eat well too but I don’t have a strict diet, just good clean eating. Then I have a mental coach that I work closely with. I do a lot of meditation and focus work within meditation. That for me was very important at Dakar at night, just to stay focused and to stay in line with my goals and what we were there to do.


We saw that at some stages you were almost at breaking point and yet you managed to push on – how do you find the strength to continue?
Wow, I was already at breaking point at stage 2.  I look back now and don’t know how I made it.   I remember lying in the tent with my wife Bryne and just crying saying “Flip, I don’t know how I’m going to get through this – the riding is so hard and the distances are so massive”.    She said to me, “I know you’re tired but please just go and look at what’s on social media, quickly log on to FB and Instagram and see the messages of inspiration coming through from so many people.”


I did just that and was totally overwhelmed by the comments, shares and likes.  That inspired me so much and it was then that I realised I could not let so many South Africans down that believed in me as well as the fans around the world and Bryne, who had sacrificed so much for me to be there.


I was blown away and still am so overwhelmed by the support. I really have a lot of people backing me, supporting me and trusting me – and that is what got me through.


Growing up who was your inspiration for the sport?
Laia Sanz –  still is. Amazingly I got to see her and chat to her this Dakar. She is so strong and has done so much for women in sport. She really is so nice and my hero.   


We see your post on facebook – This one is for you Mom,”
“Thank you for keeping me safe and giving me the strength to be the woman I am today. Can you tell us more about that (only if you are comfortable though)

I was supposed to compete in Dakar 2022 – I was ready to jump on a chartered flight to Saudi with my fellow South African  competitors when I tested positive for Covid on Christmas eve and could not board the flight. Funny how everything happens for a reason. My mum had not been feeling well and that night when I phoned my sister to tell her I was not going,  she said she had had to take my mom to hospital.   I took the first flight out to Joburg the next day to be closer to my mom. She had gone in for a brain scan and was diagnosed with a Gliobastoma ,  a very rare and horrible brain cancer that grows at 1.4% per day. I moved up to Joburg to be with my mom and nursed her for the four months that she survived. She sadly passed away on the 13th April.


That for me was the hardest thing I have ever been through. My mom was the strongest woman I have ever known. She was such an incredible person – she sacrificed everything for my sister and I.  She lived for us and when she was sick she didn’t complain once. She didn’t make it about herself. She didn’t cry once, she was so strong right up until her last breath. I didn’t leave her side for the 4 months that she was sick. I must say that during Dakar I honestly believe that she kept me safe.  I spoke to my mom throughout the whole rally asking for her strength and her guidance.  I could  feel my mom around me, during some of the stages. There were so many times in the rally when I thought I was going to die, so many close calls. She kept me safe, she got me to the finishing line, and gave me the strength to be the woman I am today.  I’m strong because I was brought up by a strong woman. Growing up racing my mom would never be on the side of the tracks because she feared for my safety. She was my biggest fan on the side-lines though. She has been gone for 9 months now but it feels like 9 days. This race was dedicated to my mom – she is my hero and I love her and I miss her.

Was there a point during the 2023 race when you thought you would have to stop?
Yes, several actually!

The first one would have been stage 4 when I was sick. We still had another 150 kms of racing and then a further 350km home into Riyadh and then we got the weather warning at the end of the special, which was really scary. The rain started 150kms into the liaison and we still had another 200kms to go. I needed to keep going and get back to bivouac which for me was the scariest riding of the whole Dakar. Those long liaisons, the long days and you are only on stage 4. You’ve only done 2000km, you’ve got another 6000km to go… so that was all very overwhelming.

Then going out into the marathon stage, I hurt my back the day before. My back was so sore I couldn’t pick up my bike, and we had now entered the Empty Quarter. I dropped my bike on every dune. The sand was so soft and the last time I dropped it, I was in a bowl – a steep little downhill, uphill, in the dunes. Not only could I not pick up my bike but I had to worry about cars coming down and riding over me. Thankfully there were medics there and a guy came over and helped me pick up my bike.   I said to myself, “Kirsten!  That’s it, you drop your bike once more and your race is over, so you don’t drop your bike, and you get there – keep your bike upright, commit to the dunes and get over them.”  I realised I was getting stuck because I was hesitating because you don’t know what’s on the other side of them. You have to go at speed to get over the dunes – it’s all very intimidating. I didn’t drop my bike again but the experience makes you emotional – you are hot and tired and crying and it takes so much to just keep going.


There seems to be an incredible amount of camaraderie and respect between racers – can you tell us how you find the support, particularly being a woman in a largely male dominated event?
I felt the camaraderie more so now at Malle Moto. We entered as a team and were the biggest team at the Dakar rally in terms of riders.  There were 27 riders, and only 14 finished.  We are all out there doing the same thing. At the end of the day we are all there just trying to survive and there is this understanding that everyone looks out for each other – everyone is quite helpful.  If you see someone with a red number, you’ve got this sense of respect from the other competitors. As a woman, the guys treated me just like any another fellow competitor which is great – no special treatment.


Only two other women have done it before and they were happy to see me competing. The organisers of Original by Motul were also very supportive of our entire team. I am used to being the only female amongst the boys. Of course that’s changing and we are trying to inspire the change and the future. Give it 10 -15 years and the Dakar Rally will have a whole lot more female competitors. That is special to me because Laia Sanz, Mirjam Pol, Sandra Gomez, we were the stepping stones and hopefully pave the future for future women in motorsport.


We saw you really showed the true spirit of SA Ubuntu by stopping and helping Saudi Arabian Mishal Alghuneim during the race – is that what Dakar is all about?
Definitely – any race is – whether it is a fun race or Dakar Rally. I was taught from a very young age that if there is a rider that needs help, you stop.  Even if it doesn’t look like he needs help, you stop and ask if he’s okay then you go. That’s what I was taught, and that’s what I’ve done my whole career. It’s cool that everyone is saying it’s SA Ubuntu, but for me it is just rider etiquette. When I had my accident in Botswana in 2013, every rider stopped.  


What would you like to change, if anything, about this kind of sport?
I would like more exposure, not for myself only, but for motorsport. Off road, Enduro, Dakar is on another level and for women racers like myself exposure helps us get the necessary sponsorship to go to more races.  My whole career has been made possible through the support of sponsors. We need the backing of big federations like MSA to help us to do that. We’ve got to get our girls out there and shown to the world.


How did you feel when you crossed that finish line – without even a single penalty?
It felt like the weight of the world had been lifted off my shoulders.  I can sleep peacefully knowing that it’s done and we did the job well. Doing it penalty free is very important to me because I enjoy the navigation, and I was vigilant. I made sure that I picked up all my way points and if I did miss one, I’d go back and get it. I enjoy that side of it and find navigation lots of fun. I did the same in 2020 and I’ve done the same in 2023 – it’s like the cherry on top.


This is an expensive sport. We see ASP International is sponsoring you now – how important are sponsors – not only in terms of financial support but also team support?
I am a full-time rider and fully reliant on sponsors to get me through. I am very fortunate and blessed that I am able to do this full-time. I am hugely grateful to ASP who sponsor me and took me on board from the beginning of 2021 to do Dakar 2022, which as you know I could not do due to Covid.  They’ve been very kind and supportive and backed me through the whole of 2022 and 2023.


Sponsors are important because a) they pay for the racing, but for me, the biggest thing is that they see your value as an athlete. Ryobi come on board for my first Dakar, then ASP came on board. Having an “ALL IN” title sponsor is an athlete’s dream. I am very fortunate with the sponsors that I have had.  ASP has been incredibly supportive and understanding.  They have become like a family, not only in terms of financial support, but team support. You know my sponsor even came to Dakar and camped with us. You can’t explain what Dakar is like until you experience it so it was so special to have him there.


Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
In ten years’ time I’m going to be 41, hopefully with a family and children. I will still most definitely be involved in motorsport because that’s all I know. In terms of racing Dakar I’m hoping to move towards the four-wheel side. I still want to be in development and involved in women in motorsport – it is in my blood.


What is one thing people would never know about Kirsten Landman?
You all know that I love dogs and that I’m very emotional. I’m actually quite a softy behind this hard, tough exterior. I also love baking and cooking. I’m pretty much an open book – what you see is what you get.


When you are not racing and practicing what do you do to relax?
When I am not training, surfing or hiking or walking my dogs I like pottering around doing things around the house and spending time in my garden. Just being outdoors is great.   I also enjoy kicking my feet up and vegging in front of the TV. I don’t do it often but I can just switch off and enjoy a good series. I love going to movies as well. Bryne and I tend to do that quite a bit or we go to good restaurants, or invite our friends over and we have a braai and I cook. The only time I really relax is when I am sleeping.


What is next?
I don’t know to be honest.  I’m still going to compete within the South African races. I’ll do a race here and there, hand-picked races. I’d like to go overseas and do some more extremes, back to Turkey for Sea to Sky and to Romania because the last one I did was in 2018. I love the Hard Enduro stuff, so more of the Hard Enduro world series – that’s my favourite.  I would love to do that and in terms of Dakar I don’t know. If I ever went back to Dakar on two wheels, I would only enter the Malle Moto class. I won’t do it any other way because you get the full experience. I am definitely not hanging up my boots – I am only 31 years old. I’ll still be out there racing. Take each race, one race at a time!

Kirsten Landman makes South Africa proud, Dakar Rally 2023
(Photo Credit: Foto P: Photographer Vinicius Branca)
Kirsten Landman in action Dakar Rally 2023
(Photo Credit Foto P and Photographer Rodrigo Barreto)

PREPARED ON BEHALF OF MSA BY CATHY FINDLEY PR.

PENTECOST’S MILESTONE HONDA WIN

Honda’s first Cross Country Motorcycle win in years


What    GXCC Cross Country Round 1 Race Report
Where    Lekoa Lodge, Villiers, Free State
When    Saturday 28 January 2023
Community    Gauteng Regional

Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda Racing enjoyed a spectacular start to its 2023  Cross Country Motorcycle season at the opening round of the GXCC Gauteng Championship at Lekoa Lodge on Saturday.

Not only did double champion Mike Pentecost celebrate his first race on a Red Rocket Honda with a dominant overall win, but the team delivered no less than six podium finishes in the Villiers, Free State race. Pentecost’s victory was also Honda’s first overall Cross Country Motorcycle victory in South Africa in the modern era.

Mike Pentecost quite literally obliterated the opposition, with an eight-minute overall victory aboard his open class 450cc OR1 Pro Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda CRF 450 RX. Teammate Hayden Louw added to the big class jubilation with sixth in OR1 Pro on his similar machine.

Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda also had a splendid outing in the Junior classes. where Murray Smith led Jaden Els home to a fine Honda Racing 1-2 in 85cc Senior. 85cc Junior teammate Liam Scheepers meanwhile kept the baby class podium red with a fine third in 85 cc Juniors.

It was a good day for Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda Racing on the other side of the age divide too. Wynand Delport ended second in the Senior class, while the ever spectacular Warrick van Schalkwyk came home fourth in Masters.

The team also had a positive outing in OR3 Pro. Tyron Beverley steamed home seventh overall and third in the 250cc class aboard his Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda CRF 250 RX. Teammate Haydn Cole backed Beverly up with a solid sixth in OR3 Pro riding a similar machine.

“That was a splendid way to start the new racing season,” Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda team boss Harry Grobler concluded. “Mike was unstoppable today and quite appropriately brought us Honda’s first overall Cross Country Motorcycle race win in South Africa, in as long as most of us can remember!

“The rest of the team shone too, not least our stars of tomorrow, Murray, Jaden, and Liam, as well as Wynand and Tyron. “We have now won the big class in Nationals, and overall in the GXCC. “Join the dots and you see what we are after next. “Our first opportunity of that comes at the opening National at Rhino Park in Pretoria 4 March. “Let’s do this!”

    
*Honda Racing salutes its partners, Tork Craft Tools, The Franchise Co, Sleepover, CIT Accessories, Motul Oils, Mitas, Leatt Protectives, Pollisport, TNT Nutrition, Galfermoto brakes & Nitro Mousse


Issued on behalf of Honda Cross Country


Photography by:  Action in Motion

KAWASAKI’S GOLDEN START

Wins, podiums all round at Lekoa Lodge


What    GXCC Cross Country Round 1 Race Report
Where    Lekoa Lodge, Villiers, Free State
When    Saturday 28 January 2023
Community    Gauteng Regional

Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki Racing with Motul, Gilbert Mining, Scottish Cables, Michelin, Acerbis, Renthal, DID and Arai, got its 2023 Cross Country Racing season off to a golden start at the GXCC Gauteng championship opener at Lekoa Lodge on Saturday. The team delivered two wins and two second places in an impressive outing in the Villiers, Free State race.

South African Seniors’ champion Kenny Gilbert remains unbeaten for over a year now, since he first swung a leg over his Pepson Plastics Factory KX 450 X. Kenny dominated the Senior race with a handy ninth overall among the best of the young guns after another faultless ride in the sandy, rocky Free State terrain.

Former motocrosser and Kawasaki ZX9 Masters circuit series regular, Brian Bontekoning made a fine GXCC Cross Country debut with a maiden Veterans class victory aboard his Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki. He was backed up by team boss Iain Pepper, who rode home fifth in the class for the oldest riders in Cross Country racing.

Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki Racing also had a very good day at the other end of the age spectrum. Young Jake Pretorius rode home second in the under-13 85cc Juniors. He was not the only team rider to strike silver, as Jaycee Nienaber rode his KX 450 X home a fine fifth overall and second in open class OR1 Pro. OR1 teammate Taki Bogiages was tenth.

Another young gun, Wian Wentzel stepped up to OR3 with a fine debut fourth in the ultra-competitive 250cc class. Two of Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki Racing’s amateur riders, Kevin Sanders came home seventh, and circuit car racer Keegan Campos was 10th in OR3 Pro-Am.

“That was a positive start to the new season,” Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki Racing team principal Iain Pepper confirmed. “Kenny continued his winning streak, Brian arrived with a bang, and Jake, Jaycee and Wian delivered great results. “The rest of us enjoyed a mixed day everyone got home safe and we all had a ball.

“Now the preparations start for the first National at Rhino Park on the 4th of March – bring it on!”


*Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki races with Motul lubricants, Gilbert Mining, Scottish Cables, Reinhardt Transport, Michelin tyres, Acerbis plastics, Renthal handlebars, DID chains and Arai helmets.


Issued on behalf of Kawasaki Cross Country

Photography by:  Action in Motion

HONDA READY TO PAINT THE TOWN RED

All-new Cross Country Motorcycle team ready to race


What    2023 Season Preview
Where    Johannesburg
When    Saturday 28 January 2023
Community    South Africa National

Honda returns to South African Cross Country Motorcycle Racing in full force with the announcement of a strong, 14-man Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda team to tackle both the 2023 Trademore South African Nationals, and the GXCC Gauteng regional championship.

Headed by a three-bike Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda CRF 450 RX attack in the premiere 450cc OR1 open class, Honda’s 2023 team comprises the top three riders of the 2022 South African OR1 championship. Big news is that reigning double SA, and double GXCC champion Mike Pentecost has changed colours and will ride a Red Rocket Honda from 2023.

Mike joins Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft regulars Gareth Cole and Hayden Louw on a trio of new 2023 model Honda CRF 450 RXs in what promises to be a formidable attack. All three men have one thing in mind, and that is to repeat that 2022 open class OR1 1-2-3 in pure Honda red this year, with an eye on an overall title as well.

Just as impressive is Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft’s four-man Honda CRF 250 RX OR3 attack. Honda rider Haydn Cole is looking to bounce back from injury in 2023 and he has no less than three new class teammates at his side. Fourth in OR3 in 2023 John Botha and former OR1 lad Tyron Beverley join Honda’s OR3 attack alongside Junior graduate Noah Maartens.

Senior rider Wynand Delport and Gerhard Vorster will fly the Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda flag in the senior class. Master Warrick van Schalkwyk is looking forward to a full season on his new Honda after coming so close to the madala’s title despite missing a round last year.

Last but not least, Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda will be attacking the kid racing classes for the first time in 2023. Third in last year’s championship, Murray Smith and quick Jaden Els will don the red in 85 Senior, while Liam Scheepers is the lad in red in 85 Junior.

“Honda took a small step back into SA Cross Country Motorcycle racing in 2022 and we delivered some great results including second and third in premier OR1,” Franchise Co Sleepover Tork Craft Honda team boss Harry Grobler concluded.

“There’s nothing small about our 2023 attack – we have a bigger and far stronger team to do the business. “The Red Rockets are back in force in South African Cross Country racing, and we will be fighting to win. “Let’s go paint the town red boys!”

The 2023 GXCC Gauteng Cross Country Championship commences with the opening round at Lekoa Lodge at Villiers, just across the Vaal River on Saturday 28 January, before the Trademore South African Cross Country Championship kicks off at Legends in Rhino Park, Pretoria 4 March.


*Honda Racing salutes its partners, Tork Craft Tools, The Franchise Co, Sleepover, CIT Accessories, Motul Oils, Mitas, Leatt Protectives, Pollisport, TNT Nutrition, Galfermoto brakes & Nitro Mousse


Issued on behalf of Honda Cross Country

KAWASAKI READY FOR VICTORY, FUN IN 2023

Fun & family as big as winning for Kawasaki Factory team


What    2023 Season Preview
Where    Johannesburg
When    Saturday 28 January 2023
Community    South Africa National

Multiple championship winning Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki Racing with Motul, Gilbert Mining, Scottish Cables, Michelin, Acerbis, Renthal, DID and Arai, is limbering up to a fresh season of Cross Country Racing in South Africa. The team has assembled a strong team of riders and machinery across the classes to chase fun and victory in 2023.

The biggest 2023 Kawasaki Cross Country news sees 2022 South African National High School champion Wian Wentzel stepping up to the 250cc OR3 class. The fast and consistent youngster switches to Kawasaki for the 2023 season aboard a lone Pepson Plastics Factory KX 250 X in a move that will have the class regulars looking over their shoulders.

He joins fellow SA champion, Seniors’ man Kenny Gilbert, who continues for a second season aboard a Pepson Plastics Factory KX 450 X alongside circuit car race star Lee Thompson on a KX 250 X. The senior team is rounded off by another man better known for his car racing exploits, team boss Iain Pepper who will be racing in the Masters’ class.

Jaycee Nienaber, who made steady progress through the 2023 season will continue in the premier class OR1 aboard a Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki KX 450 X alongside last year’s teammate Wade Den. They will be joined by Kawasaki OR3 graduate Taki Bogiages, who ended fourth in that championship in ‘22 and is looking forward to stepping up to the big class.

Pepson Plastics Kawasaki Factory Racing will also continue in the Junior classes, where Jake Pretorius joins Nathan Sinclair in 85cc Junior. Human brothers Clayton and Dylan race 85cc Juniors, where the team will also support Jayden Boyce in the GXCC races.

“Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki Racing is looking forward to another strong season of Cross Country racing with a powerful line-up of riders and bikes,” team principal Iain Pepper concluded. “Although we aim to win and we will not pull any punches, winning is not everything for us. “We also thrive on our strong family orientation and having fun.

“It is also important that we blood the sport through our junior rider program and to help kids progress from privateer to factory riders. “We are also looking forward to continuing that ethos into our third season as Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki Racing. “So, here’s to another very good year – let’s do this, go get it guys!”


*Pepson Plastics Factory Kawasaki races with Motul lubricants, Gilbert Mining, Scottish Cables, Reinhardt Transport, Michelin tyres, Acerbis plastics, Renthal handlebars, DID chains and Arai helmets.


Issued on behalf of Kawasaki Cross Country

Photography by:  Action in Motion

HUSQVARNA RACING INTRODUCES NEW BLOOD TO THEIR RIDER LINE-UP

2022 marked a, somewhat, frustrating year for the Husqvarna racing team as they were faced with turmoil through out the year as the team was plagued with injuries and even a forced retirement from the sport completely in the form of David Goosen. Nevertheless, the team diversified and conquered. With the help of heroic efforts from fill in riders and the remaining members, there were still fantastic results throughout the season.


To bring stability to the team across the 3 facets of racing, Husqvarna racing has acquired the services of 3 extremely capable riders.


Travis Teasdale is no stranger to the Enduro scene in South Africa and brings with him, years of international experience as he looks to tackle the Enduro and Extreme Enduro series onboard his Husqvarna te300 in 2023. Travis has proven his outright speed and phenomenal endurance time and time again and will look at dominance in the E2 and gold classes.

Published by: Grant Frerichs

SOUTH AFRICAN RIDER CHARAN MOORE WINS THE TOUGHEST CLASS – ORIGINAL BY MOTUL – IN WHAT HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS ONE OF THE HARDEST DAKARS IN YEARS.

31-year-old Charan Moore (bib number 40, riding for HT RALLY RAID HUSQVARNA RACING) returned to dunes and wadis of Saudi Arabia with one goal in mind: to win the Original by Motul class in what was only his second Dakar Rally.

The fact that he succeeded despite almost impossible weather conditions, was a testament to his dedication, and the skills he has honed on the equally challenging gravel plains of Namibia and in Lesotho’s Maluti Mountains (where he is the Race Director for the Roof of Africa).


After a rollercoaster two weeks which contained everything that makes the Dakar both magical and immensely tough, Charan emerged victorious. His ultimate winning margin of 20:01 belies the challenges he’s faced during the event. The combination of mechanical issues, injury and flu made this Dakar even more difficult. Charan twice built up a substantial lead over his nearest rivals, only to see it whittled away by a determined field of experienced and committed riders in what was previously known as the Malle Moto class.


Competing in the Original by Motul class tests not just riding ability, but also a competitor’s mechanical competence, organisational abilities, and capacity to perform mentally and physically in the face of extreme and cumulative fatigue.


Just like everyone he was up against, Charan was essentially on his own. Other than world-class lubricants and oils supplied by event sponsor Motul, he had no support: he was responsible for carrying out all the maintenance on his  bike, including running repairs made necessary by rocks, sand and overheating. The reward for completing each stage and working on his own bike was a too-short night’s rest in a tent on the floor.


While 2022’s Dakar had been criticised in some quarters for being uncharacteristically easy, this year’s event was anything but. Saudi Arabi is not a country that you would typically associate with heavy rains and flooding, but this year’s Stage 7 was cancelled due to the extreme weather conditions.


By this point, Charan had rebuilt his lead over his friend and sometime riding companion, Dakar veteran Javi Vega, the Spanish rider who pushed him hard all the way. Charan had recovered from his bout of flu, but further challenges were just around the next sand dune.


In the second half of the Dakar, disaster struck. A faulty gearbox necessitated an engine change that cost Charan 5 hours of mechanical hard work – and a 15-minute penalty. Radiator issues for Moore on Stage 11 saw Javi Vega reclaim the lead he had last held after Stage 5, and set the scene for a nail-biting climax.


On the penultimate stage, it was Vega’s turn to suffer, and Moore ended the day with a 17-minute lead. The final stage is typically a procession, but overnight downpours and hail meant that conditions were extremely wet and muddy with many bikes getting stuck. This last hurdle meant that Charan could not be certain of victory until the very end. Charan not only won the Original by Motul category, but came 28th overall in motorcycles and 12th  in the Rally 2 Class, a very impressive performance by anyone’s standards.


“This year’s Dakar has been a real rollercoaster, physically and emotionally. I wanted to build on my 4th place in Original by Motul and 34th placer overall from last year, and I have done it!” commented a delighted Moore at the finish line. “It’s an honour to have won a trophy of this calibre, and I’m proud to say that I’ve left nothing in the tank,” he added.


Charan confirmed that after a well-earned rest, he’ll be heading home to start planning this year’s edition of the “Mother of Hard Enduro” – the Roof of Africa 2023.


“On behalf of the entire Motul family, I’d like to give my warmest congratulations to Charan Moore on his epic achievement in winning the Original by Motul class,” commented Mercia Jansen, Motul Area Manager for Southern and Eastern Africa. “He showed the determination, passion and dedication that we value so highly as a company, and his feedback will help us further improve our high-performance products. We look forward to continuing our partnership with Charan and to many more successes in the future,” she added.

  • To find out where all our riders and teams have placed go to The Southern African Dakar Group on Facebook and Instagram.
  • You can also follow Charan Moore on Facebook and Instagram for his personal take on his Dakar Adventure.
  • To learn more about Motul’s product range and commitment to motorsports, visit https://www.motul.com/za/en

ABOUT MOTUL
Motul is a world-class French company with over 169 years of experience in the specialised formulation, production and distribution of high-tech engine lubricants (for two-wheelers, cars and other vehicles) as well as lubricants for industry via its Motul Tech division.  


Since its inception in 1853, Motul has been recognised for the quality of its products, commitment to innovation and involvement in competition, and is also acknowledged as a specialist in synthetic lubricants. In 1971, Motul was the first lubricant manufacturer to pioneer the formulation of a 100% synthetic lubricant, derived from the aeronautical industry and making use of esters technology: 300V lubricant.


Motul partners with many manufacturers and racing teams in order to further their technological product development through experience gained in motorsports. It has served as an official supplier for teams competing in iconic Road racing, Trials, Enduro, Endurance, Superbike, Supercross, Rallycross and World GT1 events, including 24 Hours of Le Mans (cars and motorcycles), 24 Hours of Spa, Le Mans Series, Andros Trophy, the Dakar Rally and the Roof of Africa.


Published by:  Listen Up – Adilia Joubert

CHARAN MOORE LEADS THE TOUGHEST CLASS IN THE DAKAR RALLY AT THE MIDWAY POINT

Charan Moore is no stranger to challenging terrain and the thrill of extreme Enduro racing. As the founder of Live Lesotho and Race Director of the iconic Roof of Africa event, he has a great deal of experience in putting some of the world’s best riders through their paces.



Having temporarily exchanged the Maluti Mountains of Lesotho for the deserts of Saudi Arabia, Charan is currently taking part in his second Dakar Rally. He took some time out from making running repairs to his rally bike in the bivouac to answer our questions. Moore is taking part in the toughest of all the categories, Original by Motul, where riders must compete without the benefit of a support team.


Monday, 09 January 2023 is an official rest day, with 8 stages already completed and 6 still to complete. At this approximate halfway point, Charan is in first place in the category, with a lead of 15’ 26” over second-placed Javi Vega (Pont Grup Yamaha).


Moore (bib number 40, riding for HT RALLY RAID HUSQVARNA RACING) actually extended his lead by winning Sunday’s Stage 8 from Al Duwadimi to the Saudi Arabian capital, Riyadh.

Q&A with Charan Moore
1.They said they were going to make this year’s edition tougher, and they have! What are the main elements that you feel have made Dakar 2023 so much harder?


Yes, the organisers have made the Dakar much tougher this year, and the first week was hectic. Compared to the 2022 race, the stages are much longer, and there are also long liaison sections to contend with.


Last year, most stages were 300km or less in length; this year, we’ve already had five stages that were each over 400km. This means more of every kind of terrain, from sand dunes to camel grass to rocky riverbeds.


The weather has also been terrible – cold, rainy and wet – so the whole event has been more intense and “in your face”. The frequent changes mean you have to be adaptable as otherwise you could easily be thrown out of your rhythm and routine.


Arriving in cities at the end of some stages and dealing with traffic on a rainy night after a long day in the saddle is just part of what makes this one of the toughest races in the world.

2.You come into this as both a competitor as well as a race organiser – what has impressed you so far this year about the organisation of the event? Also, with regards to the calls that have been made, are there areas you would have maybe treated differently?


I’ve been impressed by the number of people involved in organising the Dakar – ASO has a core team of around 300 staff, plus up to 3 000 workers. They’ve all been really competent, and the decision-making has involved considering a lot of viewpoints, including our opinions as riders. The riders’ representative has been regularly engaging with us and then sharing our feedback.


The organisers have made some good calls both for safety reasons, and to maintain the Dakar’s reputation as the ultimate Rally Raid challenge. During last year’s event, there was a perception that the course was too easy – that’s certainly not the case this year. In fact, even Dakar veterans are saying that this is one of the toughest Rally Raid events in years!


The greatest logistical challenge has definitely been the weather – this amount of rain is unusual here in Saudi Arabia, and it quickly pools up in low-lying areas, creating a bit of havoc. The organisers have a great set-up for moving the bivouac to a new location, if necessary, which definitely helps.

3. A two week event like this is an assault on your physical, mental and emotional well-being – any secrets to share on how you cope with it all?


The easiest way to cope is by having the right mindset. For me, that means always having a smile on my face, being the best possible version of myself and embracing all the difficulties and changes that this year’s Dakar has involved.

I’ve had moments where I’ve felt down and out, but then I just need to remind myself why I’m here. I’m doing this for all the people who can’t be here, and for the army of people back home who are behind me and sharing their regular support. I know I’ve got what it takes to deal with any situation, so bring it on!  

4.You’re entered…and are leading…the most difficult class in the race, the Original by Motul category by 15 minutes over Javi Vega going into the rest day, the lead has changed a couple of times this week and it’s turning into a really good dice. Do you spend any time together, either out on the course or afterwards in the bivouac?


Over the first 3 stages I was able to establish a good lead but having a fuel pump issue on Stage 4 meant that I lost a lot of time syphoning fuel. Overall, I’m trying not to push too hard, and I feel that I’ve got a lot left in the tank to gain more time if I need to.  


Javi is a cool dude and a real character. We’ve been riding together a lot and hanging out in the refuelling zones. Of course, we’re competing against each other, but the camaraderie in the Original by Motul category makes us all feel like family.  


5.As part of the rules of the class you are doing your own maintenance and servicing after each stage, are you changing your set-up as well, maybe suspension clicks or riding position or do you stick to one formula for each stage?


I did a lot of testing in advance to work out the best suspension settings and rider position, so I’ve not been changing too much during the actual race. My main priority each day is making sure that the bike works, so it’s more about fixing than tweaking. I already feel really good on the bike, so I’ve been concentrating each evening on making sure that everything is 100% ready for the next day.

6.You’re receiving so much support and encouragement from so many quarters; it must make a big difference to your morale particularly on the tough days?


I’m very conscious that while I’m just one person in the race, there are a great many people behind me watching the results, sending me messages of support and following my story. The Dakar Rally has a huge impact on people and helps them escape from the mundanity of everyday life. It’s great to have this level of support and competing in the Dakar is much easier when you know you have a whole country of passionate enthusiasts behind you.
              
The 2023 Dakar Rally resumes on Tuesday, 10 January with Stage 9, and concludes on Sunday, 15 January in the Gulf coast city of Dammam, after crossing the notorious Empty Quarter.


“Although there is a lot of riding still to come, we’d like to congratulate Charan Moore on his achievements in the Original by Motul class at this year’s Dakar Rally,” commented Mercia Jansen, Motul Area Manager for Southern and Eastern Africa. “The Original by Motul class is very much aligned with our core Motul values – to succeed in this class, you need perseverance, tenacity, passion and camaraderie or brotherliness. We’re particularly proud that a South African and Motul partner, is in the lead at the halfway stage,” she added.


As part of Motul’s commitment to supporting motorsports, the global brand is a main partner of the Dakar Rally. The presence of the Motul Lab offers competitor support and oil analysis to keep them running.


Motul products are also available for all the Original by Motul riders. Motul also sponsors drivers, riders and teams as a way of testing their products in the most demanding circumstances.


Motul South Africa has partnered with the Southern Africa Dakar Group to offer all the enthusiasts and fans a chance to win much sought-after Motul merchandise. To stay up to date and get the inside scoop on all the Southern African participants at this year’s Dakar, follow The Southern African Dakar Group on Facebook and Instagram.


You can also follow Charan Moore on Facebook and Instagram for his personal take on his Dakar Adventure. To learn more about Motul’s product range and commitment to motorsports, visit https://www.motul.com/za/en

ABOUT MOTUL
Motul is a world-class French company with over 169 years of experience in the specialised formulation, production and distribution of high-tech engine lubricants (for two-wheelers, cars and other vehicles) as well as lubricants for industry via its Motul Tech division.  


Since its inception in 1853, Motul has been recognised for the quality of its products, commitment to innovation and involvement in competition, and is also acknowledged as a specialist in synthetic lubricants. In 1971, Motul was the first lubricant manufacturer to pioneer the formulation of a 100% synthetic lubricant, derived from the aeronautical industry and making use of esters technology: 300V lubricant.


Motul partners with many manufacturers and racing teams in order to further their technological product development through experience gained in motorsports. It has served as an official supplier for teams competing in iconic Road racing, Trials, Enduro, Endurance, Superbike, Supercross, Rallycross and World GT1 events, including 24 Hours of Le Mans (cars and motorcycles), 24 Hours of Spa, Le Mans Series, Andros Trophy, the Dakar Rally and the Roof of Africa.

Published by:  Listen Up

HARD AND TOUGH – NOT FOR THE FAINT HEARTED

Not many people know a lot about the world’s toughest motorsport on two wheels, namely Hard Enduro Racing.


The FIM Hard Enduro World Championship was in fact only introduced in 2021. It is  one of the toughest endurance sports in the world, pitting man and machine against some of the world’s toughest terrain in a range of different events, from multi-day rallies to intense sprint races.  The interesting thing about this extreme sport is that it is also not only for elite riders as one may think.  Anyone with an off road bike can try out,  but only the toughest end up qualifying.


Competitors in the FIM Hard Enduro World Championship need to be masters of many trades. A typical Hard Enduro course will require the skills normally associated with trials, motocross and classic enduro.


Globally huge talents like Billy Bolt, Manuel “Mani” Lettenbichler, Graham Jarvis and  Travis Teasdale dominate the sport, but two young riders, David Cyprian and South African Matthew Green, are also starting to prove their mettle.


In the 2022 season,  Matthew Green (Matty) was the winner of the Junior Cup that formed part of the FIM Hard Enduro World Championship and managed a narrow victory in the 2022 Sea to Sky Hard Enduro in Turkey ahead of Graham Jarvis and David Cyprian.


With Matthew Green being joined by Travis Teasdale, Brett Swanepoel, Wade Young and Kirsten Landman, South Africans are proving to be world class Hard Enduro athletes and are making their country extremely proud in the process.
Motor Sport South Africa (MSA) caught up with Matthew (21) to get his perspective on a great year.


You won your first international championship this year – how does that feel?
Matty: I’ve heard from a couple of people that the feeling of winning your first world championship is the best. I hope to find out if this is true one day but for sure this year  felt amazing! All the support from everyone back home and around the world was very overwhelming. It really made it all a whole lot better!  


Who are your heroes in this sport?
My first hero in this sport was Chris Birch as he actually introduced racing to my mates and I through the Comsol racing team. I feel that, looking back on it, Chris was one of the pioneers of hard enduro as we know it today. I was really fortunate to have so much close contact and spend a lot of time with him. It was right at the start of my racing so I was really lucky. Such good times!


What is your goal for 2023?
 I’ll be running the same programme as this year in 2023. Hard Enduro World championship and Italian Extreme championship. On paper I’d like to win the juniors, rank top 5 overall and win the Italian championship. But I feel it’s much more important to keep progressing in the sport; to keep on making good connections and have another year filled with good times. If I can do this, I’ll be more than happy and naturally better results will come. I’ve got a long way to go to get to the front so let’s keep at it!


What has been your toughest race so far?
Tough question. All the races were so different this year and none particularly stand out. It’s between Erzberg and Romaniacs. Erzberg starts first because we walk the track every day. This makes the race tougher overall because it’s a constant hustle trying to dodge security, break into the mine and understand where the track is going.  Romaniacs on the other hand  is just 5 days of  the hardest riding you’ll ever do so that speaks for itself.


What do you need to succeed in this sport?
I think the most important thing you need to succeed is an amazing support team behind you all the time. The majority of the time this comes from your parents. I owe everything to my parents. They really have supported me as much as they could and continue to do so even though it’s in a different way now. We spent many years racing as a family and there is a lot of sacrifice that goes into that. The second most important thing I’d say is keeping having  fun in the sport. Don’t take it so seriously to the point that it’s not fun anymore. I’m very lucky my parents have always agreed with this and never pushed me too much so that it’s not fun. I mean you start riding bikes to have fun, so what a waste if that part disappears.


Adrian Scholtz, Chief Executive Officer of Motorsport South Africa (MSA) concludes, “We applaud Matty on his outstanding achievement this year. It really has been a great year for hard enduro with Mattie scooping the Junior Cup and Wade Young, one of Matty’s senior heroes, being crowned the king of this year’s Roof of Africa, his seventh Roof Victory and his fifth consecutive win. We have such exciting talent in South Africa and their success on the global stage bodes well for a very exciting 2023.”

PREPARED ON BEHALF OF MSA BY CATHY FINDLEY PR.
MEDIA QUERIES CONTACT JACQUI MOLOI ON 071 764 8233 OR JACQUI@FINDLEYPR.CO.ZA.

2023 FIM AFRICA MOTOCROSS OF AFRICAN NATIONS

Dear Motocross enthusiasts locally and internationally

FIM Africa, Motorsport South Africa and the MSA Motocross Commission are excited to announce that the 2023 FIM Africa Motocross of African Nations (MXOAN) will be held from 11-13 August 2023 at:

  • ZONE 7, CAPE TOWN, WESTERN CAPE, SOUTH AFRICA

Congratulations to Zone 7, and we look forward to all our national, continental, and international participants joining us for what will be a spectacular event hosted in one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

For further information regarding the facility or any queries, please feel free to contact the MSA MX Commission on email mxcommission@samxnationals.co.za

Issued by Neville Townsend on behalf of the MSA MX Commission

RIDE WITH US!