POSTPONEMENT OF 2020 EVENTS AND MEETINGS / REPORT DES ÉVÉNEMENTS ET RÉUNIONS DE 2020

Dear African FMN’s,

After much deliberation and debate, it has been decided that in light of the COVID-19 situation we all find ourselves in, Council has agreed to postpone the two 2020 Continental Championship events, as well as the Commission and General Assembly meetings.  The travel restrictions as well as the effect on our economies in Africa were taken into account when this decision was made, and it was felt that it would take a while to recover from the lockdowns currently being imposed, and therefore, securing corporate sponsorships would not be easy.

The 2020 MXOAN event will be held in 2021, and the 2021 event will be moved to 2022, this postponement will affect the host Countries i.e.  Uganda and South Africa.  Council would like to encourage the WG Chairmen to meet with their members electronically during this inactive period.

The Commission meeting and GA, will be held early in 2021 (if travel restrictions are lifted) and it might likely mean having two meetings in one year to catch up. 

As I mentioned in my mail yesterday, we find ourselves in very strange circumstances and for now we will need to adapt.

Should any member have any suggestions or comments you are always welcome to send them to the Secretariat.

Park your motorcycle, stay at home, keep healthy and your immune system strong, and see you sooner than expected.

Kind regards

MARCO COMANA
President


Chers FMN africains,

Après de longues délibérations et débats, il a été décidé qu’à la lumière de la situation COVID-19 dans laquelle nous nous trouvons tous, le Conseil a accepté de reporter les deux épreuves du Championnat continental 2020 ainsi que la Commission et l’Assemblée générale Réunions.  Les restrictions de voyage ainsi que l’effet sur nos économies en Afrique ont été pris en compte lorsque cette décision a été prise, et il a été estimé qu’il faudrait un certain temps pour se remettre des blocages actuellement imposés, et donc, la sécurisation des entreprises parrainages ne serait pas facile.  

L’événement MXOAN 2020 aura lieu en 2021, et l’événement 2021 sera déplacé jusqu’en 2022.  Cela affectera les pays hôtes, l’Ouganda et l’Afrique du Sud.  Le Conseil tient à encourager les présidents du GT À rencontrer leurs membres par voie électronique pendant cette période inactive.  

La réunion de la Commission et l’AG se tiendront au début de 2021 (si les restrictions de voyage sont levées) et cela pourrait probablement signifier avoir deux réunions en un an pour rattraper leur retard.    

Comme je l’ai mentionné dans mon courrier d’hier, nous nous trouvons dans des circonstances très étranges et pour l’instant nous devrons nous adapter.  

Si un membre a des suggestions ou des commentaires, vous êtes toujours les bienvenus pour les envoyer au Secrétariat.  

Garez votre moto, restez à la maison, gardez en bonne santé et votre système immunitaire fort, et vous voir plus tôt que prévu.

Kind regards

MARCO COMANA
President

WE HAVE TO WIN THIS GLOBAL RACE #RIDERSATHOME

The FIM has an important role to play during Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in terms of educating and informing riders around the world how to behave in a correct and responsible manner.

By reaching out to the wider FIM family, the FIM is looking to support local authorities as they put in place various safeguards in an attempt to reduce the impact of this pandemic.

Using the FIM’s social media channels – ‘We, The Riders’ and ‘FIM-Live’ – the FIM wants to reinforce the global message ‘to stay at home’ via its own campaign #RidersAtHome.


Even though riding is still permitted in some countries – the FIM is requesting that ALL riders keep their motorcycles parked in order to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries that could take up valuable healthcare resources during a period when they are already under great pressure.


The FIM is asking riders both amateur and professional, but also organisers, promoters, partners and Media from all disciplines and from all countries to record their own video messages that can be shared on social media to help spread and reinforce this important message: #RidersAtHome

Be part of the #RidersAtHome campaign!


Post your video messages on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram


Use #RidersAtHome and tag @WeTheRiderswtr

FIM INTERNATIONAL SIX DAYS OF ENDURO & FIM ENDURO VINTAGE TROPHY POSTPONED UNTIL 2021

Following in-depth discussions between the FIM, FMI and the local organising committee of the 2020 FIM International Six Days of Enduro (ISDE) and the FIM Enduro Vintage Trophy (EVT) in relation to the ongoing Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and the associated restrictions, it has been decided to postpone the events until the same period in 2021.

Whilst the ISDE was not due to take place until late August early September of this year – between Lombardy and Piedmont, Italy – there are many influencing factors that made it necessary to take a decision sooner rather than later regarding the 95th edition of what remains the oldest event in the FIM international calendar.

The annual off-road event attracts several hundred competitors from more than thirty countries around the World each year, all of whom which have to commit to extensive travel and logistic plans several months in advance of the ISDE.

Moreover, the ISDE demands many months of forward planning and work to prepare many hundred of kilometres of course, all of which rely on the permission of the various local authorities and stakeholders.

With this in mind the FIM, FMI and the local organising committee decided that in the best interest of all parties, and to ensure that the ISDE continues to hold it place as one of the most important events in the off-road calendar that all early decision to postpone the event was the right and proper action.


The 95th edition of the FIM International Six Days of Enduro will now take place from 30th August to 4th September 2021 with the 5th edition of the FIM Enduro Vintage Trophy from 2nd to 4th September, between Lombardy and Piedmont in Italy.

A keen supporter of the ISDE, FIM President Jorge Viegas explained: “The FIM along with its stakeholders have had to take many difficult decisions over recent weeks as we adapt to the ongoing COVID19 pandemic and the impact it is having on various countries around the World. Postponing the ISDE was not a decision that we have taken easily, as we know how important it is to riders from a large number of nations and to the various national federations too. However, thanks to the great co-operation of the FMI and the local organising committee we feel we have taken the correct step to be fair to all concerned and to ensure we can celebrate a great 95th edition of the ISDE in Italy in 2021. At this present time the FIM and the wider motorcycling family continue to offer their support to ensure that everyone affected by COVID19 remains safe and well during this tough period.”

FMI President Giovanni Copioli expanded: “Due to the Covid-19 outbreak health emergency, we must take this difficult decision. Postponing the 2020 FIM ISDE to next year shows that we care about the riders’ health. We were always very pleased to have the opportunity to host 2020 FIM ISDE – the most prestigious Enduro event – in Italy, but at the moment this is the right decision. I am thankful to the FIM and its President, Mr. Jorge Viegas, for the support and to the organising committee for the hard work. We are already looking to the 2021 FIM ISDE in Italy: the event will be even more exciting!”


The FIM Enduro Commission Director, John Collins added: “We all appreciate how difficult and disappointing this decision has been for the organisers and Italian Federation and they have our complete understanding. Our thoughts and prayers remain with Italy and all our other colleagues and enthusiasts at this time. We are confident when this terrible pandemic is over Italy will produce an unforgettable edition of the ISDE in 2021.”


Speaking on behalf of the local organising committee Giorgio Bandoli, Valter Carbone and Edoardo Zucca issued a joint statement: “Due to the serious situation that occurred on Italian territory and in the world, some time ago we had already started discussions with FIM and FMI to monitor the coronavirus pandemic as it was evolving. After the recent news, the shared decision of this postponement is absolutely necessary and must be done also in respect to victims of this tragedy.”

“It will be next year that, with the strength and energy that support us since the first days of this extraordinary project, we want to organise the 95th edition of ISDE, hoping that it will be able to contribute positively to the complete return of the meeting between people all over the world and offer a renewed energy to the tourism sector. We thank the FIM and FMI for the strong support provided in this very difficult moment.”

SELLER BACK ON TRACK AT ZWARTKOPS

With a new sponsor, NGK Spark Plugs, onboard the SA Superbike Series supported by Bridgestone made its way to Zwartkops Raceway for the second round of the 2020 championship on 13 and 14 March. After what was, by his high standards, a poor start to the season at the opening round, defending SA Superbike Champion Clint Seller bounced back, powering his King Price Xtreme Yamaha R1 to both heat wins.

In the SuperSport 600 class, Ricardo Otto (Otto Racing Yamaha R6) took an easy win in the first heat but had to fight all the way to the flag to secure his second win of the day.

At the opening round at the beginning of February, it was David McFadden (RPM Center/Stunt SA Yamaha R1) who took both heat wins and during Friday’s qualifying sessions he signalled his intention to carry on in that vein, topping the timesheets in both sessions. It was, however, very tight at the top with just 0.162” separating the top three at the end of the day. Seller set the second quickest time with Lance Isaacs (Superbets BMW Motorrad S1000RR) in third.

Reigning SuperSport 600 champion Blaze Baker made the step up to the litre class and was very happy with fourth on the grid after his first competitive outing on his new JBR/Rapid Bike Kawasaki ZX10R. Byron Bester (Hi-Tech Racing Kawasaki ZX10R) set the fifth-fastest time but injured his knee in the final session which could see him on the sidelines for as long as four months. Otto was the quickest of the 600s, lining up in sixth place on the combined grid. Hendrick de Bruin (NETCB Yamaha R1) headed the third row of the grid with Damion Purificati (Andala FT Racing BMW S1000RR) and the second of the 600 contenders, Taric van der Merwe (Dragon Energy Yamaha R6), alongside him. Capetonian Brett Roberts (Lights by Linea Yamaha R6) just got the better of Marius Koekemoer (Libra Racing Ducati Panigale) to take tenth with Gareth Gehlig (Superbets/BMW Motorrad S1000RR), another rider making the step up from the 600 class, in twelfth. Shaun Vermaak (DT Automotive/Gapcon Honda Fireblade) and Garrick Vlok (DCCS Coring, Cutting and Sealing Yamaha R1) completed the grid.

In Saturday morning’s warm-up session Seller gave an indication of what was to come, setting a time comfortably quicker than his best qualifying effort the day before. He put that speed to good use in the opening race, quickly opening up a gap over McFadden, who was the only rider able to maintain any sort of contact. Seller looked to be cruising to the win until about two-thirds of the way through the race when his Yamaha tried to spit him off at the exit of turn six. This gave McFadden a chance to close the gap, but he could not find a way through and had to settle for second. Behind the leading duo, there was a great three-way fight for the final podium position with Baker, Isaacs and Vlok circulating within a couple of bike lengths of each other. Unfortunately for Vlok, his challenge came to an end when his front brake failed, leaving Baker and Isaacs to continue the fight. Isaacs eventually found a way through but could not do anything about the leaders so settled for third. Baker took fourth ahead of Purificati who had Otto, on the first of the 600s, in his wheel tracks. Gehlig and Koekemoer were the last of the classified finished after mechanical maladies sidelined the rest of the field.

In the second race, Seller again grabbed the lead when the lights went out. Behind him, Baker got a great start and moved up to second with Isaacs, McFadden and Vlok right behind him. Vlok’s Yamaha let him down again so it was left to Isaacs and McFadden to put the pressure on Baker while Seller disappeared up the road. Isaacs was the first to get past the Kawasaki but despite being quicker than the reigning champion almost every lap, the lead that Seller had built up in the early stages of the race was too big to close down and the BMW man ended up just under a second and a half shy. McFadden took another couple of laps to get past Baker but by then his chances of closing the gap to the front had gone and he settled for third. Baker took another fourth place ahead of Purificati who again had Otto snapping at his heels. This time Otto didn’t have it all his way in the 600 class, van der Merwe hounded him for the whole race with the two youngsters never more than a couple of bike lengths apart and only 0.132” separating them at the flag. De Bruin was next up in eighth with Gehlig ninth, just ahead of Roberts on the third of the 600s. Koekemoer, who claimed the masters trophy ended eleventh.

The next round of the NGK SA Superbike series is scheduled to take place at the East London Grand Prix Circuit on Saturday, 25 April 2020, however, this could change depending on whether further restrictions are imposed in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Published by: Paul Bedford

Picture Caption: Clint Seller leads the way

DYED-IN-THE-WOOL MOTORCYCLIST MARK BROADY SCORES FIRST WIN IN DJ CLASSIC RALLY

Binder family at the start

By Roger Houghton

Mark Broady (43), a mechanical engineer living in Randburg, surprised many experienced motorcycle rallyists when he won the 50th commemorative Durban-Johannesburg (DJ) regularity trial for classic motorcycles on March 14. He accumulated an error of only 146 seconds at the time check points on the 596 km route (241 km on Day 1 and 355 km on day 2).

Mark, who had the second best score on Day 1 (behind three-time winner Gavin Walton) and best score on Day 2, is a lifelong motorcyclists, both as a commuter and competitor in all forms of two-wheel motor sport.

This was only Mark’s third DJ Run, having finished 40th in 2018 and 6th last year. The 1935 Velocette MAC he rode is the same motorcycle on which his father, Barry, had been running a close second in the inaugural commemorative DJ Rally in 1970 when a timing gear stripped and he had to retire about 20 km from the finish at City Deep in Johannesburg.

Father Barry Broady was also well known for winning the inaugural Roof of Africa in 1969 and following up with another win in 1970, both times riding a Honda. His son, Mark, is now restoring the Honda he rode in 1970.

This annual DJ Run celebrates the 50th anniversary of the staging of the first of these rallies that commemorated the original, annual Durban-Johannesburg road race for motorcycles which took place between the two cities from 1913 until 1936 when the authorities banned this type of motor sport event due to safety concerns.

The 2020 DJ Run which started from the Heidelberg Museum on Friday, March 13 and finished at the Shongweni Equestrian Centre the following day, attracted an entry of 106 riders, with nine non-starters and 73 finishers. The finishing rate was still impressive considering the “youngest” competing motorcycle was 84 years old and the oldest was the centenarian ABC Sopwith of Peter Gillespie.

Gillespie is a real fan of this little-known British motorcycle brand, which only produced motorcycles from 1914 – 1923. Gillespie’s 1920 machine, which he restored himself, using many specially made parts, finished a creditable 52nd. However, his team-mate, 80-year-old Paul Button, of Britain, who is also an ABC owner and worldwide registrar of the marque, was forced to retire with a broken tappet adjuster. Button still managed to cover more than 400 km on his loaned ABC and thoroughly enjoyed the DJ Run experience.

Second overall this year was Ralph Pitchford on a 1936 BSA Blue Star with an error of 173 seconds. Pitchford, an experienced off-road racer and Dakar competitor, is a preparer of immaculate motorcycles and won the DJ in 2016.

Third place was filled by Keegan Ward (32), who runs a tyre business in Randburg and is another rider with fairly limited experience in regularity rallying on a motorcycle. His error was 188 seconds.

A keen motorcyclist his whole life and son of Mike Ward, a regular DJ Run participant and winner of the 2004 event, Keegan has competed in only four DJ rallies, with the last time being 2018 when he finished 15th. He did much of the work restoring his 1936 Norton himself. He says his rally navigating skills have benefitted not only from advice from his father, Mike, but also from two other experienced rallyists, Stuart Cunninghame, and Martin Davis.

This year’s event was certainly not easy for the big field, although the weather played along on Day 1 and most of Day 2. The exception was a heavy squall of rain and hail which passed over the route on Saturday afternoon and affected the performance of several competitors, including drowning the electrics of some of the motorcycles. The secondary roads that make up most of the route were also rutted and potholed, while many speed humps also put a heavy strain on riders and their machines. On the second day they were in the saddle for almost 11 hours!

The Binder family trio of father, Trevor, and his famous road racing sons, Brad and Darryn, all qualified as finishers. Darryn (23) fared best, placing 43rd on a 1928 BMW R52, and collecting the award for the youngest rider to finish the event. He had previously ridden the DJ on a 98cc Francis Barnett when he was 16 and not permitted to ride a larger capacity motorcycle. He was forced to retire after a number of punctures on that occasion.

His brother, former Moto3 world champion and now a KTM rider in MotoGP, Brad, finished 54th on a 1935 Sunbeam. He had problems with a broken rear mudguard bracket which required lots of cable ties to try and secure it. He also had a bolt come loose in the clutch assembly. However, the big thing is that he finished, as did his father, Trevor, who came 44th on his 1925 Indian Scout.

Six of the seven riders from outside South Africa also qualified as finishers: the Youngman trio from the United Kingdom, Dorian Radue from Australia, Paul Button from the UK, and Anthony Weber from Zambia, while Andy Kaindl, of Germany, was forced to withdraw at the end of Day 1.

Samantha Anderson, who rode a 1918 Harley Davidson, which was the oldest motorcycle entered in the event, had to retire near the finish with a lack of spark for the 1 000cc V-twin engine.

The results on the DJ Run are calculated on arrival times at various checkpoints on the route as the riders try to stick as closely as possible to the set speeds, with them being able to choose to run in one of three speed groups: 50, 60 or 70 km/h. The arrival times were at check points were logged electronically by an instrument carried by the rider and downloaded at the end of each day. The rider with the lowest time penalty was the winner.

The annual, international DJ Run is run under the auspices of the Vintage and Veteran Club of South Africa (VVC), and organised by a committee with members from several local classic motorcycle clubs under the leadership of Clerk of the Course Larina MacGregor, who was doing this arduous task for the third consecutive year.

RESULTS

Overall results: 1, Mark Broady (1935 Velocette MAC), 146 penalty points; 2, Ralph Pitchford (1933 BSA Blue Star), 173; 3, Keegan Ward (1936 Norton Model 18), 188; 4, Gavin Walton (1936 AJS 9), 206; 5, Kevin Walton (1931 BSA Sloper), 219; 6, Martin Davis (1930 Sunbeam 9), 228; 7, Allan Cunningham (1936 Velocette MSS), 237; 8, JC van Rooyen (1936 Ariel NH 350), 255; 9, Adrian and Gerald Hollis (1935 Sunbeam Lion sidecar combination), 257); 10, Mike Ward (1936 Velocette MSS), 259.

Awards: Best performance by a woman rider – Bev Jacobs (1935 Triumph 21); Best performance by a first time rider: Kevin Kohler (1934 Triumph 350); Lowest score on Day 1 – Gavin Walton (1936 AJS 9); Lowest score on Day 2 – Mark Broady (1935 Velocette MAC); Oldest motorcycle to complete the course – 1920 ABC Sopwith ridden by Peter Gillespie; Oldest rider to complete the course – Neville Smith (1936 Ariel Red Hunter) who is 84; Youngest ride to complete the course – Darry Binder (1928 BMW R52) who is 23; Nominated team –  Team Prado (Martin Davis, Keegan Ward and Mike Ward); Club team – Vintage Motorcycle Club (Mark Broady, Ralph Pitchford and Keegan Ward); Most DJ Runs completed – Kevin Robertson (28 out of 30)

INTERVIEW JORGE VIEGAS,FIM PRESIDENT

Every day new events postponed. Every hour new questions…How do you live through the coronavirus crisis when you are the President of an International Sports Federation?

Are we free to choose, what are the consequences? A 63-year-old economist and President of the International Motorcycling Federation (FIM) since 2018, Jorge Viegas also mentioned doping concerns in an exclusive interview conducted by Jean-Claude Schertenleib, in Qatar last weekend “La Tribune de Genève and 24 Heures “, published in Switzerland Friday 13 March.


The coronavirus, we imagine it is worse for a President of an International Sports Federation?
I hope yes, but I refuse to dramatize. I am not a virologist; it is not for me to say what can, what will happen in the future. I chair a sports federation, which also manages other motorcycling activities, such as tourism, mobility. Our goal is to be able to follow all our activities.

With the promoters of the various disciplines, you are actors. But in this case, you are mainly spectators of political decisions?
Yes. We will always follow the directions of governments and the World Health Organisation. We recognise that the spread of the disease must be stopped. Unfortunately, a state of general panic now exists. And the worst danger is this: collective hysteria.

For the past week, each day has brought back new events. However, there are only 52 weekends in a year. Can we imagine that some championships will end at Christmas?
Yes, If necessary. Imagine that several events have yet to be cancelled and that we have to resume racing much later, well, we will go as far as it takes to keep championships worthy of the name. If it is necessary, we will go until January 2021. For us, it is not taboo.

Economically, there is going to be collateral damage. All these cancellations / postponements, the season that could be extended, all this has costs?
Of course, and if we get out of our little motorcycle world for a moment, we have to worry about the global consequences. Factories are shut down, schools closed, all economic activity slows down. There will be consequences, but they are still difficult to quantify.

MotoGP is the showcase for FIM sporting activities. But there are other disciplines, such as superbike, motocross, trial, enduro, etc. If so, do you follow the priorities by saying: “We first ensure a maximum of MotoGP races and after that we will see for the rest”?
Not at all. Things are not in conflict between our different championships, which represent the great diversity of our sport.

In terms of media coverage, cross-interest and economically – does this multiplicity not become a handicap?
In all human activities, hierarchies are created in the public, this is the case with us. The great success of F1? Simple, in the world, it represents the top of motorsport. While there are also rallies, tourism, endurance. With us, it’s a bit the same with MotoGP, although the popularity of the motocross world championship is increasing, which is very pleasing.

But the general public could be lost, shouldn’t we restrict the offering?
On the contrary, and we are currently working on a new discipline, the e-bike, reserved for electric bikes. There were first races last year, an internal commission has been created and a first FIM Cup is planned, with events in Europe and Asia; I just learned that the United States was also very interested. So no, there are not too many disciplines, there is a motorcycle sport for everyone, in all its forms. An ice race is nothing like a circuit race, but come see one, you will be overcome!

Let’s move on. Before the current crisis erupted, a burning dossier was on your desks: the positive test for nandrolone (an anabolic steroid) by the Italian MotoGP rider Andrea Iannone. However, we are still awaiting judgment…
The FIM president has nothing to do with the trial. It has been examined by the lawyers for the two parties, who have sent the various documents they deemed necessary and a committee of three judges, all very experienced, who will very soon give its decision. Afterwards, there will be the possibility of an appeal to the CAS, both on the part of Iannone and his employer, Aprilia, if the sanction is considered too severe; or on the part of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) if it considers that the sanction is not sufficient.

Do the specifics of motorcycle sport always go hand in hand with the list of products prohibited by WADA?
With us, skill, psyche and courage are more important than brute physical strength. Not to mention the problem of painkillers. I plan to meet the new president of WADA, Witold Banka, to see if it would be possible to have a list more suited to our sport.

Picture Caption:  The President of the International Motorcycling Federation, Jorge Viegas remains optimistic despite facing the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis  © FIM

FIM ANTI-DOPING – FIM INTERNATIONAL DISCIPLINARY COURT (CDI) IMPOSES 18 MONTHS SUSPENSION ON MOTOGP RIDER ANDREA IANNONE

Please find enclosed the Press Release / FIM Anti-doping

FIM Grand Prix World Championship
FIM International Disciplinary Court (CDI) imposes 18 months suspension on MotoGP Rider Andrea Iannone.

The FIM International Disciplinary Court (CDI) handed down on 31 March 2020 a decision imposing a period of ineligibility of eighteen months on Italian MotoGP Rider Mr. Andrea Iannone, commencing on 17 December 2019 (i.e. the effective date of the Provisional Suspension) and which shall end on 16 June 2021.

Click here to read more

INFORMATION – FIM ENDURO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS AND ENDURO WORLD CUPS – 2020 CALENDAR UPDATE 30 MARCH – ENDUROGP ITALY AND HUNGARY POSTPONED

Please find enclosed the Press Release / FIM Enduro World Championships & Enduro World Cups 2020 Calendar UPDATE 30 MARCH

EnduroGP Italy and Hungary postponed
Given the ongoing circumstances and restrictions associated with the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, the FIM, the Italian Motorcycling Federation (FMI), the Hungarian Motorcycle Sport Federation (MAMS), the local organizers and the promoter ABC Communications regret to announce that the events originally scheduled on 05-07 June in Spoleto, Italy and on 12–14 June in Hungaroring, Hungary have been postponed.

All parties are currently evaluating if it will be possible to re-schedule the events later this season.

Further updates will be issued in due course.

Click here to view the document

INFORMATION . FIM LONG TRACK WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – 2020 CALENDAR UPDATE 30 MARCH

Please find enclosed the Press Release / FIM Long Track World Championship 2020 Calendar UPDATE 30 March

Given the ongoing circumstances and restrictions associated with the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, The FIM, the German Motorcycling Federation (DMSB) and the local organiser (MSV Herxheim) regret to announce the cancellation of the opening event of the 2020 FIM Long Track World Championship that was scheduled to take place on 21 May, in Herxheim, Germany.

Unfortunately it will not be possible to reschedule this event; all parties continue to monitor the situation and will communicate about the updated calendar once it is possible and appropriate to do so.
 

Click here to view the document

INFORMATION – FIM ENEL MOTOE WORLD CUP – MOTOE JEREZ ROUND POSTPONED – 2020 CALENDAR

MotoE™ Jerez round postponed


The announcement from the FIM, IRTA and Dorna regarding the postponement of the Red Bull Gran Premio de España entails the postponement of the first MotoE™ event of the season, which was also set to be held at the Circuito de Jerez-Angel Nieto from the 1st to the 3rd of May. The ongoing coronavirus outbreak has obliged the events to be postponed.

The second pre-season test for the FIM Enel MotoE™ World Cup, originally planned for the 8th to the 10th of April in Jerez, will also not take place as scheduled.

As the situation remains in a state of constant evolution, new dates for the MotoE™ test and first race cannot be confirmed until it becomes clearer when exactly it will be possible for them to take place. A revised calendar will be published as soon as available.

RIDE WITH US!